Difference between revisions of "Brian Haw"

From IndyMedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Line 5: Line 5:
 
Brian first came to Parliament Square June 2001 to protest the economic sanctions placed on Iraq by the West. The sanctions had led to the unnecessary deaths of many thousands of innocent men, women and children, and having witnessed the suffering and premature death of one of his own children, Brian felt obliged to act. His objections to conflict were certainly heartfelt having visited the Killing Fields of Cambodia, even travelling to Iraq in the early nineties and seeing for himself the impact UK + US foreign policy.
 
Brian first came to Parliament Square June 2001 to protest the economic sanctions placed on Iraq by the West. The sanctions had led to the unnecessary deaths of many thousands of innocent men, women and children, and having witnessed the suffering and premature death of one of his own children, Brian felt obliged to act. His objections to conflict were certainly heartfelt having visited the Killing Fields of Cambodia, even travelling to Iraq in the early nineties and seeing for himself the impact UK + US foreign policy.
  
Various legal challenges were mounted over the years by the authorities to remove Haw but each one was successfully evaded. Consequently his campaign became synonymous with not just his opposition to war but the right of freedom to assemble.   
+
Various legal challenges were mounted over the years by the authorities to remove Haw but each one was successfully evaded. Consequently his campaign became synonymous with not just his opposition to war but the right of freedom to assembly.   
  
 
Absent the occasional court date Brian maintained a continued presence on the pavement opposite the British Parliament for almost ten years. His makeshift camp, originally very modest in size, grew as supporters donated signs and artwork. In 2007 artist Mark Wallinger  
 
Absent the occasional court date Brian maintained a continued presence on the pavement opposite the British Parliament for almost ten years. His makeshift camp, originally very modest in size, grew as supporters donated signs and artwork. In 2007 artist Mark Wallinger  

Revision as of 23:29, 19 June 2011

Somewhere to sort out a feature article on Brian Haw, to fill out the one that has been started.

Early on Saturday morning, veteran peace protester Brian Haw passed away in his sleep. A long-term chain smoker, he had been diagnosed in September 2010 with lung cancer, and despite starting treatment almost immediately at St Thomas's hospital, and subsequently spending six months in Germany for private treatment, he tragically lost his battle with the disease.

Brian first came to Parliament Square June 2001 to protest the economic sanctions placed on Iraq by the West. The sanctions had led to the unnecessary deaths of many thousands of innocent men, women and children, and having witnessed the suffering and premature death of one of his own children, Brian felt obliged to act. His objections to conflict were certainly heartfelt having visited the Killing Fields of Cambodia, even travelling to Iraq in the early nineties and seeing for himself the impact UK + US foreign policy.

Various legal challenges were mounted over the years by the authorities to remove Haw but each one was successfully evaded. Consequently his campaign became synonymous with not just his opposition to war but the right of freedom to assembly.

Absent the occasional court date Brian maintained a continued presence on the pavement opposite the British Parliament for almost ten years. His makeshift camp, originally very modest in size, grew as supporters donated signs and artwork. In 2007 artist Mark Wallinger


...

Brian Haw 7/1/49 - 18/6/11 RIP

Brian Haw.jpg

Brian Haw, passed away on Saturday 18th June 2011.

Newswire: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

Links: parliament-square.org.uk | brianhaw.tv

Read More...

Articles with "Brian Haw" in the title posted to UK Indymedia, this isn't all the coverage he has had on UK Indymedia as many articles won't have had his name in the title:

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007